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Knowledge, Research and Innovation

Why a New OSR?

The new OSR survey is quicker to complete than the old OSR: it has up to a third-fewer questions than prior years', and orchestras that already submit data to the CDP will find that their OSR is already half complete!

The new interface is also much easier to use, offering participants the ability to select a preferred view format, as well as a ‘smart’ pre-population of previously provided data. And behind the scenes, automatically verified calculations will ensure a new level of data hygiene.

The range of benefits available to OSR participants has expanded, too. Participants will continue to receive the League’s detailed OSR benchmarking report, widely used by orchestras to inform strategy, planning and management. In addition, they will gain access to a top-tier suite of educational, analytic, and other business intelligence resources provided by DataArts.

The collaboration between the League and DataArts is especially significant because it connects the orchestra field with the largest and fastest-growing arts and culture data set in the United States. Through the collaboration, the League has the opportunity not only to extend participation in the OSR, but also to undertake new forms of comparative analysis for the benefit of the orchestra field. 

OSR: Orchestra Statistical Report

The League has been collecting data from the orchestral field since 1946, and its Orchestra Statistical Report (OSR) is the largest and most comprehensive orchestra data set in the United States. Only League members have the opportunity to contribute to – and use – this unique resource, which many rely on for planning, fundraising, management, and case making.

Beginning with Fiscal Year 2015, OSR data is being collected on the League’s behalf by DataArts. DataArts empowers the nonprofit arts and cultural sector with high-quality data and resources in order to strengthen its vitality, performance, and public impact. The Cultural Data Profile (CDP) is DataArts' flagship service, which thousands of cultural nonprofits use annually to report their financial and programmatic information. OSR data for the period 2006-14 is analyzed and reported in our landmark study Orchestra Facts 2006-14.

 

Building Audiences for the Arts: Research from The Wallace Foundation

 

For 15 years, The Wallace Foundation has supported audience-building efforts by arts organizations and commissioned research to understand what works, what doesn’t and why.

Learn more about Wallace’s six-year, $52 million Building Audiences for Sustainability initiative to help arts organizations build audiences.

Taking Out the Guesswork: A Guide to Using Research to Build Arts Audiences

Market research expert Bob Harlow shows how arts organizations can use qualitative and quantitative research to attract and retain new audiences.

Watch the webinar.

View the PowerPoint presentation here.

Download the guide here.

The Road to Results ; Effective Practices for Building Arts Audiences

The Road to Results: Effective Practices for Building Arts Audiences

This report identifies and examines nine practices of arts organizations that successfully expanded their audiences.

Converting Family into Fans: a Case Study

Converting Family into Fans: How the Contemporary Jewish Museum Expanded its Reach

The Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco moves to a larger space and secures a nine-fold increase in family visitors of all backgrounds.

Opening New Doors: A Case Study

Opening New Doors: Hands-On Participation Brings a New Audience to The Clay Studio

Short classes, flexible schedules, new communications and "Date Nights" help Philadelphia's The Clay Studio attract new, younger audiences.

Getting Past “It’s Not For People Like Us”: Pacific Northwest Ballet Builds a Following with Teens and Young Adults

Learn how the Pacific Northwest Ballet garnered new interest in traditional and contemporary ballet among teens and adults under the age of 25.

Extending Reach with Technology: Seattle Opera’s Multipronged Experiment to Deepen Relationships and Reach New Audiences

Learn how the Seattle Opera used technology including simulcasts, interactive lobby displays and behind-the-scenes videos to engage audiences.

Someone Who Speaks Their Language: How a Nontraditional Partner Brought New Audiences to Minnesota Opera

Learn how an opera company found new audience members among women age 35 to 60.

More Than Just a Party: How the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Boosted Participation by Young Adults

Learn how the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Boosted Participation by Young Adults.

Cultivating the Next Generation of Art Lovers

Cultivating the Next Generation of Art Lovers: How Boston Lyric Opera Sought to Create Greater Opportunities for Families to Attend Opera

Learn how Boston Lyric Opera sought to create greater opportunities for families to attend opera.

Building Deeper Relationships: How Steppenwolf Theatre Company Is Turning Single-Ticket Buyers Into Repeat Visitors

Learn how the Steppenwolf Theatre Company is turning single-ticket buyers into repeat visitors.

Attracting an Elusive Audience

Attracting an Elusive Audience: How the San Francisco Girls Chorus Is Breaking Down Stereotypes and Generating Interest Among Classical Music Patrons

Learn how the San Francisco Girls Chorus is breaking down stereotypes and generating interest among classical music patrons.

Learn more about The Wallace Foundation’s research on audience development for the arts.

These resources are made possible by The Wallace Foundation. The League is pleased to be working in partnership with the Foundation to help share ideas and practical solutions to problems in building audiences for the arts.

ORR 2010-2011


Repertoire Reports by Composer

These reports list all classical season works performed by orchestras during the specified season. The reports are alphabetized by composer, then by the composer’s works. The reports include the orchestra, conductor, and soloist (if applicable) who performed the work, and the date of the first performance.  If an orchestra performed the work on a series that included multiple concerts, only the first concert is indicated.


Repertoire Reports by Meeting Group

These reports list all classical season works performed by orchestras during the specified season.  The reports are alphabetized by composer, then by the composer’s works.  The reports include the orchestra, conductor, and soloist (if applicable) who performed the work, and the date of the first performance.  If an orchestra performed the work on a series that included multiple concerts, only the first concert is indicated.


Concert Programs by Meeting Group

These reports list the programming of each concert. The reports are organized alphabetically by orchestra, then chronologically by date of concert. The reports also include the conductor and soloist where applicable, and individual concert programming.


Soloist Appearances

These reports list all soloists scheduled to appear with orchestras throughout the 2009-10 season.  The reports are organized alphabetically by instrument of the soloist, then by last name of the soloist.  The reports include the first date of the concert(s), as well as the orchestra and conductor who accompanied the soloist. The reports also include the work performed on the concert.


Performances of Works by U.S. Composers

These reports list the performances of American composers. The lists are alphabetized by composer, then by the composer’s works, and include the date first performed, conductor, orchestra and soloist (if applicable). The “performances” column on the right side of the page indicates the number of times the work was performed by each orchestra, while the “total performances” category indicates the aggregate sum of all orchestra performances. (Note that certain composers are not included on this list)


Performances of Works Composed within the Past 25 Years

These reports list the performances of contemporary works, composed within 25 years of the specified season.  The lists are alphabetized by composer, then by the composer’s works, and include the date first performed, conductor, orchestra and soloist (if applicable).  The “performances” column on the right side of the page indicates the number of times the work was performed by each orchestra, while the “total performances” category indicates the aggregate sum of all orchestra performances.


Premiere Performances (World, U.S. and Canadian)

These reports list all premieres including World, US, and Canadian. Under each heading, the reports are alphabetized by composer, then by the composer’s works and  includes who commissioned the work, the first performance date, conductor and soloist (if applicable) and the orchestra giving the premiere.

Youth, Education and Community

This section offers data and research on youth orchestras, music education, community engagement and more. For more information, visit the Youth, Education and Community section or check Advocacy and Government to see how you can become an advocate for music education.

Narrative Perspectives

This section offers a variety of insightful perspectives about the modern orchestra field.

National Arts Data

CPANDA, the Cultural Policy & the Arts National Data Archive, is the world's first interactive digital archive of policy-relevant data on the arts and cultural policy in the United States. It is a collaborative effort of Princeton University's Firestone Library and the Princeton Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies

Arts and Economic Prosperity
This study by American for the Arts documents the key role played by the nonprofit arts and culture industry, and their audiences, in strengthening our nation’s economy.

National Arts Index
This report by Americans for the Arts is a highly distilled annual measure of the health and vitality of arts in the United States by using 76 equal weighted, national-level indicators of arts activity. This report covers an 11-year period, from 1998 to 2008.

Performing Arts Research Coalition
The Performing Arts Research Coalition (PARC) brings together five major national service organizations (NSOs) in the performing arts to improve and coordinate the way performing arts organizations gather information on their sector. For further analysis, click here.

Orchestra Library Resources

  • MOLA (Major Orchestra Librarian Association) Resources
    Founded in 1983, the Major Orchestra Librarians' Association comprises of over 270 performance organizations around  the world, represented by more than 450 librarians. The job of these performance librarians is to acquire, prepare, catalogue and maintain the music for each institution. Through MOLA, librarians share information and resources to help them in their daily work.

  • The Edwin A. Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music
    The world's largest lending library of orchestral performance material, with over 21,000 titles and growing. Owned by the Free Library of Philadelphia, you can hear pieces from the Fleisher Collection on the first Saturday of every month from 5:00 to 6:00 PM on WRTI-90.1 FM and wrti.org. Kile Smith, the Collection's curator co-hosts Discoveries from the Fleisher Collection, which “uncovers the unknown, rediscovers the little-known, and takes a fresh look at some of the remarkable treasures of the Fleisher Collection.” Visit fleisher.org or The Free Library to learn more.

  • BMI Repertoire Search
    BMI is the bridge between songwriters and the businesses and organizations that want to play their music publicly. As a global leader in music rights management, BMI serves as an advocate for the value of music, representing more than 8.5 million musical works created and owned by more than 600,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers.

  • ASCAP Repertoire Search
    The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) is a membership association of more than 470,000 US composers, songwriters, lyricists and music publishers of every kind of music. Through agreements with affiliated international societies, ASCAP also represent hundreds of thousands of music creators worldwide. They are the only US performing rights organization created and controlled by composers, songwriters and music publishers, with a Board of Directors elected by and from our membership.

  • SESAC Repertoire Search
    SESAC, Inc. was founded in 1930 to serve European composers not adequately represented in the United States. Though the company name was once an acronym, today it is simply SESAC and not an abbreviation of anything.  

    With an international reach and a vast repertory that spans virtually every genre of music, SESAC is the fastest growing and most technologically adept of the nation’s performing rights companies.

  • Composers You Should Know, from the Maag Library
    While this LibGuide was made primarily for Music History and Composition students, everyone can benefit from learning about at least a few representative composers from different time periods and countries.

  • Music Lending Library
    The Music Revitalization Project has a large selection of music and plan to continually expand our holdings. The lending library is offered to any area band, community or scholastic organization, within a fifty mile radius of Norton, MA.

Innovation and Technology

For more information, visit the Learning and Leadership Development section.

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