Human resources profiles

Human Resources will include director and manager levels.

To view profiles, choose:

  •  By state, choose your state in the left hand menu
  •  Sorted by last name, below 

 

Shawna Lake

Director of Human Resources
Indianapolis Symphony
Indianapolis, Indiana
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indianapolis logo

Time in current position: Few months
Years in the field: 10 years in HR

Majors:
Human Resource Management and Organizational Communication

Additional Training:
Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) certification

Career Path:
Human Resources Coordinator, ProTrans International
Director of Human Resources, Roman BrandGroup, a J. Walter Thompson Company
Human Resources Manager, Indianapolis Zoo

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
A challenging aspect to this position is having employees under a collective bargaining agreement, which is new for me.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?

Being a part of the arts community. I love hearing live music while I work!

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?

Prior non-profit experience was very valuable for me coming into this role.

Sandy Larson

Director of Human Resources
The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra
St. Paul, Minnesota
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St Paul

Years in current position: 6
Years in the field: 26 years in HR

Majors:
B.A. Business Management

Additional Training:
Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) certification

Career Path:
Started in payroll in 1982 at a publishing company. Moved into Human Resources in 1984 in the banking industry, then in the fields of healthcare, manufacturing, and city government.

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The most challenging aspect is that I am the only HR person for the orchestra, balancing all the requirements, from routine tasks to strategic planning.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I had never worked for a non-profit and the orchestra position sounded like an exciting and challenging position.

What would you do differently?
I began working and then went back to school. If I had it to do all over again, I would have gone to school first and then began my career.

What advice would you offer to someone considering working in human resources for an orchestra?
There are many different aspects to working in HR. I would recommend to someone just starting out to gain experience in everything to determine if doing it all (generalist) is right for you or if a particular track (benefits, compensation, training, etc.) interests you.

Christina Moon

Director of Human Resources
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Baltimore, Maryland
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baltimore_so

Years in current position: 2
Years in the field: 9

Majors:

English and History, double major

Additional Training:
Certification courses, non-certification courses

Career Path:
Started in the training arm of human resources
Manager of Training, Capital Restaurant Concepts
Director of Human Resources, Deluxe Restaurant Group
Director of Human Resources, Big Steaks Management

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Everything! The orchestra world was new to me. I knew little about classical/symphonic music, and I certainly did not know anything about the inner workings of an orchestra. I had never before worked with unions, so that has been challenging.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I answered a CareerBuilder ad. This was the job I was most excited about. My husband is a classical music nut, and was very excited for me. I knew it was the right job for me from the get-go. Chefs (with whom I’d been working for years) and musicians have very similar personalities—or as I say, “chefs are musicians with different instruments.”

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
I was really good at my job so the progression to training came naturally. I would say that showing dedication and committment to doing the job right, every day, was what got me noticed and got me promoted through the ranks.

Any other advice?
You have to have a thick skin to work behind the scenes in the orchestra world. It isn’t about us—it's about the musicians and the music.