Administrative profiles

Administrative roles include the positions of Executive Director, President and CEO.

To view profiles, choose:

  • By state, choose your state in the left hand menu
  • Sorted by last name (A-H), below
  • Sorted by last name (J-Z), click here


Krina Allison

Executive Director
Student Orchestras of Greater Olympia
Olympia, Washington
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 8
Years in the field: 18

Majors:
B.A. Music Education
Master’s in Music Education

Career Path:
Band Director 
Youth Orchestra Executive Director
Rescue Mission Development Director

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Working part-time and trying to keep up with all the work, including board, development, marketing, financials, volunteers, community relations/partnerships, and technology (website).

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I think it is vital that children participate in music and are offered an outlet outside of the public school music program.

Would you have done anything differently?
Today, executives of orchestras are being trained in orchestra management and that would have been a great experience back in my college days.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Be an excellent musician (perform reguarly in an ensemble yourself). Be an educator (public school music teachers have a different perspective and you should be their advocate and supporter). Get your certification in orchestra management.

Michael Beattie

President and Executive Director
Mississippi Symphony Orchestra
Jackson, Mississippi
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 4
Years in the field: 8

Majors:
Bachelor of Music, University of Nebraska-Lincoln 
Master of Music, College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati

Additional Training:
Various seminars offered through the League of American Orchestras, especially the Executive Leadership Program
   
Career Path:
Full time career in church music (1975-1999)
Chief Operating Officer, Louisville Orchestra (1999-2004)

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Everything about the activities of an orchestra boils down to relationships. The challenges I encounter are to expand these various and diverse relationships into ones that create strong board and community ownership of the orchestra.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
My love of classical orchestral music and my firsthand knowledge of the ways the arts change lives.

What was your first step towards an orchestra career?
I began by networking with people in the business

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
A passion for quality live orchestral music is vital. Education and experience in understanding how to bring people together to support a worthy goal is important. Being a musician, in some form, is very helpful. The League offers excellent resources.

Lisa Bryington Barr

Executive Director
Boston Musica Viva
Boston, Massachusetts
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

bmusica viva

Time in current position: 4 months
Years in the field: 2

Majors:
Musical Arts, minors in human and organizational development, managerial studies

Additional Training:
Orchestra Management Fellowship Program, Essentials of Orchestra Management, League of American Orchestras

Career Path:
Project Manager,  Handel and Haydn Society
Manager of Institutional Giving and Special Projects, Handel and Haydn Society

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The most challenging aspect of my job is managing my time. As the only administrator, it is my responsibility to do anything and everything, from fundraising to finances to production work to marketing to stuffing envelopes.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I love music and I think of my current work as making music.

What was your first step toward an orchestra career?
My first big step was participating in the League’s Essentials of Orchestra Management, which was a fantastic opportunity that assured me orchestra management was the field for me.
What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Work to accumulate important leadership experiences as early as possible.

Any other advice?
Find trustworthy mentors in the field and solicit their opinions as you move forward in your career.

Andrew Berryhill

Executive Director
Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra
Duluth, Minnesota
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andrew_Berryhill.jpg

Years in current position: 6
Years in the field: 17

Majors:
Communications

Career Path:
Intern, Interlochen Arts Center
Intern and student employee, University Musical Society-Ann Arbor
Artist Assistant, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Operations Manager, Jonathan Wentworth Associates
Assistant Director of Programming, Chicago Symphony Orchestra

What is the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspect of your day-to-day work?
The complexity of the decision-making process.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
The opportunity to work with exceptional artists.

What were you first steps toward an orchestra career?
Singing in and helping run the Michigan Men’s Glee Club


Anthony Boatman

Executive Director
Boise Philharmonic
Boise, Idaho
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Anthony_Boatman.jpg
Years in current position: 8
Years in the field: 24

Majors:

History

Additional Training:
Fund-raising workshops, music education

Career Path:
Three years in the Peace Corps, as a teacher in Cameroon
Sixteen years in development and non-profit management
Director of Development, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra,  1984-87
Director of Development, San Antonio Symphony, 1988-93
Director of Development, Fort Worth Symphony, 1993-98

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Working with a diverse constituency of musicians, patrons, board leaders, and others committed to advancing the cause of great music in our community.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
A lifelong avocational love of music.

What was your first step when beginning your working career?
I joined the Peace Corps, which was a challenging, interesting, and inspiring way to mature.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Do it! Doing well by doing good is a very satisying way to build a career.

Any other advice?

It would probably help to learn to read music, something I never managed to do! It hasn’t held me back, but it would have been nice.

Marie Breed

Executive Director
Wisconsin Youth Symphony Orchestras
Madison, Wisconsin
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

marie_breed.jpg
Years in current position: 4
Years in the field: 4

Majors:
Bachelor of Music
Master of Music Education
Master of Music Performance (conducting)
Master of Business Administration

Additional Training:

Occassional seminars in management and human resources

Career Path:
Ten years as a public school music teacher (K-12), Unionville-Sebewaing (MI) area schools, St. Johns (MI) public schools, Muskego-Norway (WI) public schools   University-level teaching–band, music appreciation, conducting, music theory (Michigan State)

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The most challenging aspect, and surprisingly time consuming, is dealing with personnel management issues.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
My own orchestral performance. My success in the administrative aspects of teaching and leading programs.

Would you do anything differently?
I began teaching instrumental music to grades 5-12 in a small rural district. I would not change that, as the knowledge of how to work with students, parents and families, as well as the daily happenings of music education, is critical to my current position.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Do not aspire to the top immediately. Take the time to learn in a grassroots way, whether it be through teaching, as I did, or through working in various entry and mid-level aspects of a position. Rather then start as an executive director of a small organization, try to gain practical experience in multiple areas of the industry with a smaller organization(s).

Any other advice?
Be patient. There is a learning curve and it doesn’t happen overnight. Ask yourself why you want to be in this industry. If the main answers center around yourself, find a new field.

Len Bull

Director of Volunteer Activities
Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra
St. Louis, Missouri
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 6
Years in the field: 6

Majors:
Bachelor of Music Education 
Masters in Business Administration

Additional Training:
Volunteer management seminars

Career Path:
Trumpet player in the U.S. Air Force Band
Freelance musician: trumpet/flugelhorn/piano/keyboard
Accounts Payable Clerk, Partner Communications, Inc.

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Surprising: the enthusiasm and energy of our volunteers. Interesting: Working with and coordinating special events with the musicians of the SLSO. And there is something different to do each day.  Challenging: Managing a huge variety of projects and people

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
Love for music and wanting to stay in a music career after retiring from the U.S. Air Force Band.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Make sure you are doing it for the love of the music or organization.

Any other advice?
Being a part of an organization that everyone has heard of and has the utmost respect for, even if they have never attended a concert, is very rewarding.

Loma L. Cobbs

Executive Director
Tacoma Youth Symphony Association
Tacoma, Washington
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Loma_cobbs.jpg
Years in current position: 15
Years in the field: 15

Majors:
Math/Physics

Additional Training:
Music since the age of four, business, business law

Career Path:
Teaching Assistant, Assistant Professor, Professor

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Variety, new challenges, and the excitement that comes with working with kids through music.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
My early music education.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?

Work with the best mentors available, especially in the area you want to pursue. Take internships, volunteer, or whatever is necessary.

Any other advice?
Learn all aspects of every job within the office.
 

David Deitrick

Executive Director
Springfield Symphony Orchestra
Springfield, Ohio
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deitrick_David.jpg
Years in current position: 4
Years in the field: 4

Majors:
Bachelor’s in Music (Education)
Master’s in Music (Conducting)
D.M.A. (Conducting)

Additional Training:
I received both musical and administrative training in the Army, in addition to my university training.

Career Path:
I spent 30 years in the Army in military music, five years as a player and 25 years as conductor and administrator.
Positions: Music Director and Executive Director at Fort Dix, New Jersey; Heidelberg, Germany; and West Point, New York; Assistant Conductor in Washington, D.C.; Music Supervisor in San Antonio, Texas (13 states) and Europe; Visiting Director of Bands, Northern Kentucky University (after U.S. Army).

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
I enjoy working with professional musicians, and find patron development very satisfying. I am more involved in helping the music director shape the musical direction than I expected, mostly driven by the need to develop the audience. The constant demands of raising money are always a challenge.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
When nothing was opening up that interested me as a conductor after leaving the Army and the university, I chose to capitalize on my management experience with musical organizations.

Would you do anything differently?
I chose the Army when I realized I wasn’t ready to teach, then found that I like working in a professional musical setting. I made music my focus, both my work and my hobby. 

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
My background is pretty unique. I have found my musical training and experience an exceptional preparation for being an executive director.  I would advise anyone to have a solid grounding in our art and a love for what we do.

Any other advice?
Running an orchestra is more about people than processes. You must want to develop a rapport with musicians, your board, and your patrons/donors. If you don’t truly like and understand people, you won’t be very successful.

Craig Escamilla

Executive Director
Symphony of Southeast Texas
Beaumont, Texas
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 1
Years in the field: 2

Majors:

Undergraduate: Music (Vocal Performance)
Master of Business Administration (Expected completion: May 2010)

Additional Training:
Essentials of Orchestra Management, League of American Orchestras

Career Path:
Summer intern (unpaid), Symphony of Southeast Texas
Director of Communications and Education, Symphony of Southeast Texas
Executive Director, Symphony of Southeast Texas

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Dealing with the various constituents: patrons, board members, donors, musicians, and staff. It is also the most important, and the most fulfilling.

Looking back, would you do anything differently?
I intended to go to graduate school to pursue a conducting career, but realized I was much more interested in the administrative aspect of orchestras. A friend and colleague who preceded me as executive director of the Symphony of Southeast Texas provided much encouragement and several experiential opportunities. After he left to assume a similar position with a larger orchestra the board conducted a national search, but decided in the end to ask if I was interested in the position. I gladly accepted the challenge. I am very pleased that I did because I love this industry and cannot wait to see where it goes in the future, to be a part of that movement.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Try to find an open door and get in. Once you’re in, you’re hooked. Work hard, learn all you can, and get involved with the League, which is an invaluable resource to people at all levels and capacities within the field. Most importantly, make sure you know the music inside and out. Buy recordings, attend concerts, read books, just learn and know the music. This sounds harsh, but if you don’t love the music, you should really look for a different field, because what we do must always be in service of the music. And to serve the music fully and completely, you must know and love it.

Scott Faulkner

Executive Director
Reno Chamber Orchestra
Reno, Nevada
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Faulkner

Years in current position: 8
Years in the field: 9

Majors:
B.A. Music, Pacific Lutheran University
M.M. Music Peformance-Double Bass, University of Nevada, Reno

Additional Training:
Essentials of Orchestra Management, League of American Orchestras

Career Path:
Instructor, University of Nevada, Reno 
Artistic Operations Manager, Reno Chamber Orchestra 
Bassist

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The variety. The fact that most of the job is relating to people.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
As an orchestral musician, it was a natural fit for me. And when I needed a job, this one came open. It  then evolved from artistic operations manager into executive director.

Looking back, would you do anything differently?
Had I known this would be where I’d end up I probably would have taken a few business classes, so I would have had a better handle on nuts-and-bolts issues. The music side of things has never been a problem because of my background.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
I think the League’s Essentials and Orchestra Management Fellowship programs are a terrific way to test the water. Orchestra managers are open and happy to talk, so I would pick the brains of a number of managers you know and respect.

Any other advice?
It is a tough but rewarding field. Sometimes I wonder if I have thick-enough skin. It can be exhausting to try and appease/please so many constituents. My last piece of advice is that the job seems to be the most rewarding when my focus is at its most noble. When my goal is nothing less than making the world better, I’m happy and things click. When I get too business oriented, it’s much worse.

Alan Fletcher

President and CEO
Aspen Music Festival and School
Aspen, Colorado
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Aspen music festival

Years in current position: 3
Years in the field: 30

Majors:
Music Composition

Additional Training:
Harvard Institute for Educational Management

Career Path:
Dean, Provost, Head of School of Music

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Board relations

What inspired you to work for in the orchestra field?
Excellent opportunity, service to music

What was the first step in your professional career?
Took a teaching job.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
People skills more important than anything.    

Ryan Fleur

President and CEO
Memphis Symphony Orchestra
Memphis, Tennessee
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ryan_Fleur.jpg
Years in current position: 5+
Years in the field: 12+

Majors:
B.A. Economics, minor in business administration, Boston University

Additional Training:
Orchestra Management Fellowship program
Leadership training programs in Boston, Memphis, and Mellon Foundation-funded Orchestra Executive Leadership Training Program, Center for Creative Leadership

Career Path:
Program Administrator, Boston Ballet
Executive Assistant, New York Philharmonic
Executive Director, Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?

The variety, the need for balance, the overwhelming need to constantly delegate and focus on communicating a simple and clear message over and over and over and over again.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
My time at Boston Ballet demonstrated the civic value of the arts. As a pianist, I wanted to do what I was doing, but for music. The orchestra field was the most receptive to my inquiries.

What was your first step toward an orchestra career?
After determining I did not want to go into international trade and finance, I sought an internship in arts management, which connected me with Boston Ballet. At the same time, I read What Color is Your Parachute? and created my own job description.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
The Orchestra Management Fellowship was invaluable, but my greatest learning experience was spending six years running a small-budget orchestra in a setting where I could constantly make mistakes and learn from those mistakes.

Any other advice?

It’s the hardest, most complex work you will do, but incredibly rewarding.

Rhonda Y. Golden

Executive Assitant and Secretary to the Board
Fort Wayne Philharmonic
Fort Wayne, Indiana
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

FWayne

Years in current position: 2
Years in the field: 2

Majors:
Associate of Science, Business Management

Career Path:
Worked retail for ten years. Management status in past jobs.

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Being a part of something that is so unique and beautiful. And of course meeting the people who both perform and attend the concerts.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
The love I have for all types of music.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
The number one thing, probably, is if you don’t love music you will not understand what we do. And the second thing is to remember that there is no perfect job, but if you love what you do it will be your ideal. The last thing to remember is patience is a virtue and it takes a lot of virtue to make this job a successful one for you.

Any other advice?
If it is your passion, no one can discourage you. If someone can talk you out of doing it, it’s probably not for you.

 


Cassandra E Goldstein

Assistant to General Manager and Music Director
Indianapolis Symphony
Indianapolis Indiana
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

indianapolis logo

Years in current position: 9
Years in the field: 9

Majors:

Music Education, minor in voice

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?

The interesting part of my job is the coordination of communication and flow of information between artistic and administrative departments. Likewise, coordination of the artistic and administrative personalities/agendas so that there is an understanding of sometimes opposing viewpoints.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
Love of music.

Would you do anything differently?
I would have more actively pursued this career had I known it was available. This field was not available in music school when I was there. I did do secretarial/assitant work briefly for the conductor of the symphonic band and he told me I had a natural affinity for that kind of work; he was right.
 

Cybele Grimes

Executive Director
Rogue Valley Symphony
Ashland, Oregon
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 1.5
Years in the field: 5

Majors:
Music, minor in art

Additional Training:

Non-profit Management certification

Career Path:
Project Managment, Amdahl Corporation
Rogue Valley Symphony Orchestra: Box Office Manager, Publicity Manager and Advertising Director, Development Associate

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The most surprising aspect of my position has been the opportunity to meet some of the most interesting people, including soloists, musicians and patrons. The biggest challenges have been bringing the three arms of the organization—board, orchestra, and office—into a place of mutual understanding and cooperation, working toward our long-range goals together.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
Music, and especially classical music, has always played a significant role in my life. After graduating from school I realized that I wanted to work in the non-profit sector and the orchestra seemed like a good fit.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Consider carefully all aspects of working in the non-profit business climate as opposed to the for-profit climate.
 

Diane Hilbert

Executive Director
Midland-Odessa Symphony and Chorale
Midland, Texas
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Diane_Hilbert.jpg
Time in current position: 15 months
Years in the field: 20+

Majors:
B.A. Performance
M.M. Orchestral Conducting
M.M. Performance
D.M.A. Performance, Conducting
Career Path:
Freelance musician, Houston, Texas
Program Head/Instrumental Conductor, Mohave Community College
Director of Education, Richmond Symphony

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The lack of real world experience and insight of the musicians and working in an orchestra

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I’ve been in music since junior high school. It’s what I do and a big part of who I am.

What might you do differently?
If I began again, I would go back to school for my M.M. sooner.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
In arts administration: Learn about the jobs in the field. Apply for the League’s Orchestra Management Fellowship Program.

Any other advice?
Know what kind of lifestyle you want to live. The money you earn for these jobs and the demands on your time may not be for you. But you can really be happy in this field if you truly can’t see yourself doing anything else. 

Keith Hampton

Executive Director
Racine Symphony Orchestra
Racine, Wisconsin
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Keith_Hampton.jpg
Time in current position: 6 months
Years in the field: 10

Majors:
Undergraduate: Voice performance, French
Graduate: Psychology

Career Path:

Assistant to the Director, Music Division, The Boston Conservatory
Music Department Staff Assistant, Harvard University
Business Manager, The Boston Secession
Senior Finance and Administration Assistant, MIT Office of the Arts
Executive Director, River Arts, Inc.
Founder, Brave Records

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Management of board committee meetings and activities; new developments in fundraising trends; outreach ideas and grantwriting.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?

My first musical training was on viola, and I have always enjoyed being part of an ensemble.

What would you have done differently?

I would like to have attended more local and student performances, and I’ve made this a goal in my current position.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?

Take advantage of all the professional organizations that exist, for networking and training opportunities that you won’t be able to use unless you show up.

Any other advice?
Keep an open mind! Audiences, communities, and music are ever-changing. It helps to be flexible and stay focused on the mission of your organization.


Jim Hirsch

Executive Director
Chicago Sinfonietta
Chicago, Illinois
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

jim_hirsch.jpg
Years in current position: 4
Years in the field: 28

Majors:
Music

Additional Training:
I have attended numerous conferences, workshops, and other educational training programs and have benefited from all of them. I have also been very fortunate to have had some great mentors throughout my career.

Career Path:
Vice President and Executive Director, Chicago Association for the Performing Arts
Executive Director, Old Town School of Folk Music (Chicago)
Founder, chicagoclassicalmusic.org
Producer, radio (NPR)
Consultant, arts and social service agencies

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
Given that this is my first orchestral job, in some regards, it’s all been surprising, interesting, and most certainly challenging.  The orchestra field has some unique challenges in terms of audience development and these I have found the most difficult to address. Additionally, working in a market with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and many other good organizations makes for a very competitive environment. I have really enjoyed working on the Sinfonietta’s brand/positioning strategies as we vie for awareness.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
I took this job for two reasons. First, I believe in the Chicago Sinfonietta’s diversity mission and admire its commitment to innovative programming. Second, I wanted to see how my background and skills would work in the orchestral field. Of course, I love the music and the sound of the orchestra, but don’t particularly like many of the customs of the field.

What were your first steps when starting your working career?
I began as a performer and music teacher. I evolved into a management role and have experienced success in those endeavors.  I wouldn't do anything differently, though I suspect that my path would be impossible to duplicate today.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?

You need to feel fulfilled and self-actualized by being a part of the arts. Few make very much money, there is a fair amount of stress, and sometimes the work is extremely long and hard. Having said that, there are few things more satisfying than being a part of a team that brings something sublime to the world. If you don’t love that, don’t do this.

David Hollingshead

Executive Director
Spokane Youth Symphony
Spokane, Washington
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 3.5
Years in the field: 19

Majors:
B.A. Education
M.S. Communincations

Career Path:
Entrepreneaur
Educator, Spokane District 81
General Manager, Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The parents’ ability to contribute to the mission through their connections and influence is surprising and interesting. Most challenging: parents.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
Talented kids and non-profit culture have a purity that imbues creativity into business decisions; forming alliances with the for-profit sector.

Would you do anything differently?
Goals aren’t meant to be achieved, necessarily, but to give direction. Many paths are forks in the woods and choosing one over the other makes all the difference (paraphrasing Robert Frost).

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
All levels of communication are valuable. From one-on-one to small groups to public speaking, the ability to exchange and facilitate ideas is paramount. Also being able to recognize opportunity and seize it requires imagination.

Any other advice?
Know your strengths and try to recognize the particular strengths of others. Not being able to play anything other than the radio does not detract from administering an arts organization. 

Warren W. Hyer

Executive Director
Central Ohio Symphony
Delaware, Ohio
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Years in current position: 17
Years in the field: 17

Majors:
B.M. Performance

Additional Training:
Association of Fundraising Professioanls training and seminars

Career Path:
Personnel Manager
Professional musician
Manufacturer of musical instruments

What are the most surprising, interesting or challenging aspects of your day-to-day work?
The challenges of building a quality product and getting it all done.

What inspired you to work for an orchestra?
Desire to help this organization move forward and to help our community.

What were your first steps toward an orchestra career?
Volunteering as a trustee and helping wherever needed. It would not happen the same way today. Too much has changed.

What advice would you offer to someone considering the orchestra field?
Work for the organization, not for yourself. It will come.