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Advocacy and Government

URGENT! Speak up today to support NEA and NEH funding!

July 17, 2018 

Please ACT NOW to urge your member of the U.S. House of Representatives to support full funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for the upcoming FY19 fiscal year.

The House is preparing to vote on the Interior Appropriations bill, which includes a $2 million increase in funding for each agency. An amendment offered by Rep. Glenn Grothman (WI-6) proposes a 15% cut in funding for the NEA and NEH, a $23.25 million decrease in each agency's budget.

Year after year, Congress has demonstrated strong bipartisan support for the arts and humanities, and this year the full Appropriations Committee has recommended funding the NEA and NEH each at a level of $155 million for FY19.

Now is the time to act! Contact your Representative and urge opposition to the Grothman amendment, and continued support for the grants and leadership provided by the NEA and NEH. The League will keep you informed as events unfold in the House and update you on how you can help with the next step - consideration by the U.S. Senate.


Summer policy news: protected species, UBIT, visa changes, and arts funding

July 25, 2018 

League speaks up in global protected species discussions

heatherThis week, delegates from across the globe are gathered in Geneva, Switzerland to consider a broad agenda that includes policies controlling how musical instruments may cross international borders under the terms of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The League is an official participant in the negotiations, working in partnership with global music organizations and conservation leaders to ensure that rules related to rosewood, ivory and other materials found in orchestral instruments address urgent conservation concerns while also supporting ongoing international cultural activity. The League provides essential assistance to orchestras as they navigate the permit requirements for international tours, and is also deeply engaged in efforts to improve the policies. Further policy improvements will be sought as the terms of the treaty are negotiated in May of 2019.

Read more about how the League is working in partnership with NAMM, WWF, and dozens other stakeholders in the current issue of Symphony magazine, "Conserving Endangered Woods: Advocating for Orchestras and Musicians."

(Pictured above: League VP for Advocacy, Heather Noonan, speaks up on musical instruments rules at CITES) 

Urgent concerns about new UBIT rules

The comprehensive tax reform provisions signed into law last December include a new requirement for nonprofits to pay Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) equal to 21% of the value of commuting and parking benefits provided to employees. This tax on nonprofit expenses is unprecedented and prompts many questions about how to comply with the new rules. While no guidance has been issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to clarify which benefits are subject to the tax and how to value certain benefits, the new requirements officially took effect beginning on January 1, 2018.

Since many orchestras offer parking and transportation benefits for staff and musicians, the costs of this new tax on nonprofits could be considerable. And, the IRS may choose to apply the tax whether nonprofits pay for benefits directly or employees pay them through a pre-tax compensation reduction agreement.  The League has partnered with the broader nonprofit sector in meetings with officials at the U.S. Treasury Department, contributed to a recent Politico article on this topic, and has filed comments on behalf of orchestras to Treasury and IRS leaders requesting a delay in implementation and an immediate formal public rule-making process to clarify many outstanding questions about the new tax.

With the 2018 tax year already well underway, we'll be keeping orchestras informed as soon as any new guidance on this topic is issued by the Internal Revenue Service. You can take action today by asking elected officials to urge Treasury to delay this new tax.

Engage foreign guest artists? Big visa and tax changes ahead!

U.S. immigration and tax policies are changing in ways that will affect orchestras that engage international guest artists. Effective September 11, 2018, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will have full discretion to deny visa petitions without first asking for more evidence to support the application by issuing a Request for Evidence (RFE) or a Notice of Intent to Deny, reversing years of practice. Meanwhile, USCIS is also setting in place a policy that will create barriers for artists seeking to extend their stay in the U.S. for additional performances. Learn more about each development in the latest news alert on Artists from Abroad: Denials, Requests for Evidence, and Extensions of Stay.

When it comes to paying guest artists, some artists can apply for an agreement that determines their tax liability in advance. U.S. organizations should be aware that the Internal Revenue Service has announced that starting October 1, 2018, nonresident performers will only be able to qualify for a Central Withholding Agreement if they individually earn $10,000 or more in gross income within the calendar year. Learn more here: IRS Narrows CWA Eligibility.

The League is partnering closely with the full array of U.S.-based national arts organizations to weigh in with policy leaders at USCIS and IRS regarding these changes and welcome examples that can help illustrate the need for improved policies. In the meantime, petitioners need to take extra care when assembling visa materials: please review the League's up-to-date guidance at Artists from Abroad: The Complete Guide to Immigration and Tax Requirements, and don't hesitate to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , which stands ready to help with your visa petitions!

NEA and arts education funding moves forward

The FY19 funding forecast looks bright for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and arts education at the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Despite an attempt to cut 15% from the budgets of the NEA and National Endowment for the Humanities, bipartisan support in the House of Representatives prevailed in the completion of the Interior funding bill, which included a $2 million increase for each agency, to a level of $155 million. The Senate Appropriations Committee has passed a recommendation for the same amount, with the full chamber expected to take action soon. 
     
  • FY19 funding for Arts Education at the U.S. Department of Education received a vote of confidence in both the House and Senate. The Appropriations Committees of both chambers approved their respective bills to fund the departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services, including $29 million for Arts in Education in FY19 - in fact, the Senate Committee calls for "no less than the fiscal year 2018 level" of $29 million. The full House and full Senate have yet to vote on the larger bills that contain this funding, so advocates are encouraged to contact their elected officials in support of robust Arts Education funding at the Education Department.

Summer homework: meet with elected officials!

The U.S. House will be Representatives will be taking its traditional August recess, while the Senate has shortened it its own recess to just the first week of August. If you have not yet invited elected officials to see your orchestras in action, try to get on their calendars while they are home. But remember, advocacy is year-round and does not always have to be in person. We all have a part to play in speaking up for orchestras, and together we can make a big impact! 

 
 

Summer policy news: protected species, UBIT, visa changes, and arts funding (2)

July 25, 2018 

League speaks up in global protected species discussions

heatherThis week, delegates from across the globe are gathered in Geneva, Switzerland to consider a broad agenda that includes policies controlling how musical instruments may cross international borders under the terms of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The League is an official participant in the negotiations, working in partnership with global music organizations and conservation leaders to ensure that rules related to rosewood, ivory and other materials found in orchestral instruments address urgent conservation concerns while also supporting ongoing international cultural activity. The League provides essential assistance to orchestras as they navigate the permit requirements for international tours, and is also deeply engaged in efforts to improve the policies. Further policy improvements will be sought as the terms of the treaty are negotiated in May of 2019.

Read more about how the League is working in partnership with NAMM, WWF, and dozens other stakeholders in the current issue of Symphony magazine, "Conserving Endangered Woods: Advocating for Orchestras and Musicians."

(Pictured above: League VP for Advocacy, Heather Noonan, speaks up on musical instruments rules at CITES) 

Urgent concerns about new UBIT rules

The comprehensive tax reform provisions signed into law last December include a new requirement for nonprofits to pay Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) equal to 21% of the value of commuting and parking benefits provided to employees. This tax on nonprofit expenses is unprecedented and prompts many questions about how to comply with the new rules. While no guidance has been issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to clarify which benefits are subject to the tax and how to value certain benefits, the new requirements officially took effect beginning on January 1, 2018.

Since many orchestras offer parking and transportation benefits for staff and musicians, the costs of this new tax on nonprofits could be considerable. And, the IRS may choose to apply the tax whether nonprofits pay for benefits directly or employees pay them through a pre-tax compensation reduction agreement.  The League has partnered with the broader nonprofit sector in meetings with officials at the U.S. Treasury Department, contributed to a recent Politico article on this topic, and has filed comments on behalf of orchestras to Treasury and IRS leaders requesting a delay in implementation and an immediate formal public rule-making process to clarify many outstanding questions about the new tax.

With the 2018 tax year already well underway, we'll be keeping orchestras informed as soon as any new guidance on this topic is issued by the Internal Revenue Service. You can take action today by asking elected officials to urge Treasury to delay this new tax.

Engage foreign guest artists? Big visa and tax changes ahead!

U.S. immigration and tax policies are changing in ways that will affect orchestras that engage international guest artists. Effective September 11, 2018, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will have full discretion to deny visa petitions without first asking for more evidence to support the application by issuing a Request for Evidence (RFE) or a Notice of Intent to Deny, reversing years of practice. Meanwhile, USCIS is also setting in place a policy that will create barriers for artists seeking to extend their stay in the U.S. for additional performances. Learn more about each development in the latest news alert on Artists from Abroad: Denials, Requests for Evidence, and Extensions of Stay.

When it comes to paying guest artists, some artists can apply for an agreement that determines their tax liability in advance. U.S. organizations should be aware that the Internal Revenue Service has announced that starting October 1, 2018, nonresident performers will only be able to qualify for a Central Withholding Agreement if they individually earn $10,000 or more in gross income within the calendar year. Learn more here: IRS Narrows CWA Eligibility.

The League is partnering closely with the full array of U.S.-based national arts organizations to weigh in with policy leaders at USCIS and IRS regarding these changes and welcome examples that can help illustrate the need for improved policies. In the meantime, petitioners need to take extra care when assembling visa materials: please review the League's up-to-date guidance at Artists from Abroad: The Complete Guide to Immigration and Tax Requirements, and don't hesitate to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , which stands ready to help with your visa petitions!

Summer homework: meet with elected officials!

The U.S. House will be Representatives will be taking its traditional August recess, while the Senate has shortened it its own recess to just the first week of August. If you have not yet invited elected officials to see your orchestras in action, try to get on their calendars while they are home. But remember, advocacy is year-round and does not always have to be in person. We all have a part to play in speaking up for orchestras, and together we can make a big impact! 

 
 

League and orchestras relaunch campaign to support in-school music education

September 11, 2018 

Just in time to celebrate National Arts in Education Week, the League of American Orchestras has updated and relaunched "Orchestras Support In-School Music Education," a statement of common cause first drafted in 2007 with input from more than 50 orchestras and revised in 2018. The statement--then and now--is a collective opportunity for orchestras to take local, community-specific action to improve access to music education in schools.

Orchestras are civic-minded community-based organizations, and together we can help improve access to the benefits of music learning by advocating for access to a complete in-school music education for all students. All orchestras--youth and adult; professional and community--are invited to join the national effort. Signing on is just the first step; we encourage orchestras to use the statement as a catalyst to start or renew conversations about supporting music education in the schools. Improving the education system requires support from the entire community--orchestras can do their part by mobilizing staff, musicians, trustees, and volunteers and by working with community partners toward common objectives.

Whether your orchestra is endorsing the statement for the first time or is among the 250 orchestras renewing a long-standing commitment, we welcome all to use the sign-on form to inform us about the advocacy work you are doing and to let us--and your community--know that you stand in support of increasing access to music education for all students.
 

  1. Sign on to the statement today!

  2. Make use of Music Education Advocacy Tools

  3. Learn more about advocacy in the League guide, "Playing Your Part: An Orchestra's Guide to Public Policy Advocacy."

 

 

Autumn Advocacy News You Can Use

November 14, 2018 

The results are (mostly) in: midterm election update

Following last week's midterm elections, the U.S. House of Representatives is set to welcome at least 80 new Representatives come January. While a handful of seats in the House and two in the Senate have yet to be called, Democrats have won enough seats to gain control of the House, while the Republicans retain control of the Senate. All elected officials have a vested interest in representing their constituents, so orchestra supporters should start planning now to contact new and returning elected officials about the ways orchestras contribute to community and how they also need continued Congressional support. The League's free online guide, Playing Your Part, offers easy-to-read advice on how to build successful relationships with policymakers. Stay tuned for a deeper dive into the new session of Congress when we begin the new year!

Fiscal year 2019 begins: where do things stand?

Just days before the end of the fiscal year, Congress passed a mixed package that finalized funding for some bills while buying time via a continuing resolution for several others. The Interior bill, which includes the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has not been finalized, so Congress has until December 7 to complete that FY19 allocation. While the Senate Appropriations Committee and the full House have so far approved an additional $2 million increase for both the NEA and NEH, the delay of this decision-making until after the midterm elections means advocates should stay tuned and be ready to contact their elected officials to shore up support with many other priorities expected to affect lame duck funding negotiations. One bill that was finalized included funding for the U.S. Department of Education, which preserved $29 million for the Assistance for Arts Education program and slightly increased the allocation for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants (SSAEG) program. The bipartisan support for these programs, among others, is also notable because the larger Labor-Health-and-Human-Services-Education bill is notoriously difficult to pass; in fact, it was last enacted in 1996. In other agency news, the President nominated Mary Anne Carter to serve as the chairman of the NEA. Carter has been serving as acting chairman since June, and her appointment to a four-year term will need to be confirmed by the Senate.

Weighing in as Congress considers pension reform

Congress has established a Joint Select Committee on Solvency of Multiemployer Pension Plans with a mandate to propose a bipartisan legislative solution by November 30 to improve the status of the many underfunded multiemployer pension plans nationwide. Starting this past spring, the American Federation of Musicians and Employers' Pension Fund (AFM-EPF) Plan, in which many orchestras participate, has been directly calling on employer and musician participants to contact Congress in support of immediate Congressional action to provide relief. Although the Joint Select Committee has been charged with a mandate to craft a legislative solution, there are many hurdles and barriers to Congressional action, which will likely unfold over months to come. If your orchestra has a stake in the outcome of pension reform, please see the online campaign created by the AFM-EPF, which is governed by both musicians and employers.

'Tis the season for year-end giving campaigns

As the year ends, and donors' giving habits are newly influenced by comprehensive tax reform, remember that the IRA Charitable Rollover was retained under the new law and may be a powerful incentive for giving whether or not donors may be shifting to the growing ranks of taxpayers that will no longer itemize their tax returns. Since the IRA rollover went through several rounds of expiration and reinstatement before being made permanent in 2015, very many donors may be unaware of this important giving option. Take a look at our overview of the IRA Charitable Rollover, and the League's summary of key areas of tax policy that changed under tax reform.

UBIT guidance a "priority" for Treasury

On November 8, the Department of Treasury announced that guidance on the new UBIT rules is now part of the agency's 2018-19 Priority Guidance Plan. The comprehensive tax reform provisions signed into law last December include a new requirement for nonprofits to pay Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) equal to 21% of the value of commuting and parking benefits provided to employees. The League has partnered with the broader nonprofit sector to ask for clarification of the new rules, delayed implementation, and eventual repeal of this unprecedented tax on nonprofit expenses. While no guidance has been issued by the Internal Revenue Service to clarify which benefits are subject to the tax and how to value certain benefits, the new requirements officially took effect beginning on January 1, 2018. While the exact timing of next steps is still unclear, the League will be keeping orchestras informed as soon as any new guidance on this topic is issued by the Internal Revenue Service.

Progress in improved policies for musical instruments

At a meeting in Sochi, Russia in early October, significant progress was made towards improving policies that regulate travel and sales of musical instruments under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The League's Heather Noonan, VP for advocacy, delivered remarks on behalf of musical instruments group worldwide. During consideration of policies regarding the rosewood found in many string, percussion, and woodwind instruments, she called on decision makers to take swift steps towards a solution that can be adopted at the Conference of the Parties in May 2019. Delegates attending the meeting of the Standing Committee of CITES responsible for policy development unanimously agreed that trade in musical instruments is not detrimental to the threatened species under consideration, and advanced a recommendation to exempt both commercial and noncommercial trade in finished musical instruments, parts, and accessories from the new rosewood permit requirements that were put into place in January 2017.

The League will be engaged in the next steps required for this recommendation to be fully adopted and implemented by all 183 parties to the treaty when negotiations take place in May in Sri Lanka, and continues to partner with the National Association of Music Merchants and music stakeholders worldwide. To learn more about how protected species policies affect musical instruments, visit the League's resource page.

 

Speak Up Today to Repeal New Tax on Nonprofits

December 4, 2018 

The comprehensive tax reform provisions signed into law last December include a new requirement for nonprofits to pay Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) equal to 21% of the value of commuting and parking benefits provided to employees. The League has partnered with the broader nonprofit sector to ask for clarification of the new rules, delayed implementation, and repeal of this unprecedented tax on nonprofit expenses. While no guidance has been issued by the Internal Revenue Service to clarify which benefits are subject to the tax and how to value certain benefits, the new requirements officially took effect beginning on January 1, 2018.
 
A tax package now under consideration by Congress includes a provision to repeal the new tax on nonprofits. You can take action today by contacting your elected officials to ask them to:

  1. Weigh in with the Treasury Department on your behalf, and ask for a delay in implementing the new tax.
  2. Take legislative action to repeal the new tax on nonprofit parking and transportation employee benefits.



Thanks to efforts by orchestras, in partnership with the broader nonprofit sector, there is growing awareness of this topic on the Hill and increasing interest in repealing this provision. Please speak up today, and stay tuned as the League continues to keep you informed on further developments!

Act Now to Support NEA Funding!

July 19, 2013

Washington, D.C. - The House Interior subcommittee, will meet on Tuesday, July 23 to set the FY14 funding level for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). We’re asking orchestras in the districts of all full Appropriations committee members to contact their elected official in support of NEA funding. The budget climate is particularly intense this year, as the Interior committee has 18% fewer funds to distribute to programs than in the last fiscal year.

Please call, fax, or use our e-advocacy tool to reach your member of Congress and convey how critical NEA support is in your community. NEA direct grants to arts organizations and NEA support to state arts agencies increase the capacity of orchestras to provide public access to performances, preserve great classical works, support arts education for children and adults, and nurture the creative endeavors of contemporary classical musicians, composers, and conductors.

Please keep the League informed of any responses you might hear, and thank you for your ongoing advocacy!

Contact Your Representative Today!

Charitable Giving, Sequestration, and Instrument Passport Proposal

March 12, 2013

League Testimony Supports Charitable Giving Incentives
Incentives for charitable giving remain on the table as Congress and the White House debate budgetary and tax policy issues. The House Ways & Means committee is in the midst of a fact-finding and public engagement process to inform comprehensive tax reform, and hosted a February 14 hearing exploring possible changes to the tax deduction for charitable giving. Under discussion are a wide array of proposals, some to expand tax deductions and others to curtail them, and while members of the committee offered many statements in support of the charitable sector, several members posed questions as to whether nonprofits are sufficiently focused on serving urgent community needs. The League has submitted testimony to the committee urging protection and expansion of charitable giving incentives and illustrating the public value orchestras contribute in partnership with other community-based nonprofit organizations. With the House, Senate, and President all weighing options for tax reform, this area is certain to be one of ongoing debate throughout the coming months, and is a priority policy area for orchestras and our national partners in the broader nonprofit sector.

Sequestration and the Arts
What do the messy debates in Washington over spending limits and across-the-board 5% cuts to domestic spending mean for your orchestra? 

o    If your orchestra is an NEA grant applicant, please stay tuned for further details. There is one more major round of NEA grant announcements anticipated this coming spring, and the agency is required to make reductions in core grant-making funds as a result of the sequester. The 5% cut to the NEA’s overall FY13 budget also means advocacy to protect and restore funding in the next budget year – FY14 – is particularly important.

o    If your orchestra engages international artists – as ever, start the visa process as early as possible to brace for any staffing impact that might be felt in visa processing centers here in the U.S. and at consulates abroad. Remember to consult www.artistsfromabroad.org and League staff for any help you might need with the visa process.

o    If your orchestra partners with public schools, be aware that the cut to domestic spending will impact the federal resources that flow to support public education programs and can also impact direct funding of the Arts in Education program of the U.S. Department of Education. Strengthen your orchestra’s local, community-based advocacy efforts to seek greater access to arts education in public schools.

Instrument Passport Under Consideration
Important news for orchestras and individual musicians touring internationally! Musicians carrying instruments with endangered species materials (such as ivory, tortoise, and rosewood) require special permits in order to cross borders in compliance with international and domestic rules. Note that this permitting process is separate from the duty requirements and carnet process familiar to most musicians. This week, the U.S. is proposing an instrument passport concept for consideration by the parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which may streamline the process for complying with certain international permit requirements. The League, in partnership with the American Federation of Musicians and The Recording Academy, has been in communication with U.S. Fish and Wildlife as it pursues an initial international discussion of the passport proposal. The current rules for obtaining permits are quite complicated, as there are layers of CITES requirements, plus each country's own domestic rules - and there is not a central resource for understanding what is required when traveling to multiple countries. While a streamlined process and the expressed interest in facilitating international travel with instruments is welcomed, the League, together with our national partners, is asking the U.S. and its international counterparts to ensure that any new approach takes into consideration the practical issues of cost and time involved with obtaining permits. The current CITES meeting concludes on March 15. Whether the passport concept is formally adopted, recommended for further consideration, or tabled, the League will stay in close contact with U.S. Fish and Wildlife to seek clear guidance on how musicians can comply with permit requirements. Please stay tuned!

Show Your Value
Invite your member of Congress and their staff to see your orchestra in action. Congress will take a break from D.C. and return to their home districts March 23 through April 7. These are perfect times to schedule a meeting with your Representative and/or to extend an invitation for them to see how your orchestra serves your community.

Protecting Wireless Microphone Use in Future Spectrum Auction

January 30, 2013

In the past two years, wireless microphones have been moved around the broadcast spectrum to make room for new electronic devices entering the market place – causing confusion and new equipment costs.  This month, the League has joined other national performing arts groups urging the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to protect the use of wireless microphones as a new broadcast spectrum auction takes place and the airwaves are once again re-organized.  As a member of the Performing Arts Wireless Microphone Working Group, the League has submitted comments to the FCC urging protections to ensure that performing arts organizations may continue to use wireless microphones without interference and additional burdensome equipment costs.

The comments urge the FCC to provide adequate interference protection for the full range of performing arts microphone users.  We ask the FCC to expand the eligibility of organizations to obtain Part 74, Subpart H licensing, which would enable large venues that exceed the capacity of two safe-haven channels for wireless microphone use to find relief through a geo-location database without the customary 30 day waiting period. For small and mid-sized performing arts organizations, the working group emphasizes the need for the FCC to continue reserving two safe-haven channels to provide sufficient interference protection. The written comments also point out the high cost of transition already borne by the performing arts sector in the last required move– a cost the sector can ill-afford when the FCC inevitably directs wireless microphone users to move again.  To that end, the working group proposes that the costs of moving be shared by those entities moving into spectrum currently being used by performing arts wireless microphone users. Finally, the working group requests that the FCC provide reasonable time for transition once digital sound equipment is deemed ready for professional use and also to provide reliable guidance for wireless microphone purchasers, such as an easily accessible link to database searches that will show safe-haven and other available channels for specific locations. Read the complete comments, and contact the League’s Washington, D.C. office with any questions.

IRA Charitable Rollover Returns!

January 4, 2013

The IRA Charitable Rollover provision was reinstated for 2012 and 2013 in the tax deal signed into law this week. The IRA Rollover provision has proven to generate new and increased charitable donations for orchestras in the years it has been available. In the course of its history, the IRA Rollover has expired and been renewed several times, leaving many donors confused about the status. Here are the facts:

2012:
The IRA Rollover expired at the end of 2011, but is now retroactively reinstated for 2012. If any donors aged 70 ½ and older had instructed their IRA administrators to make a distribution of up to $100,000 directly to a charity during 2012, that distribution will not be treated as taxable income for 2012. However, Congress recognized that few donors would have done this, since the provision had not yet been reinstated. So, the law now includes two additional opportunities for individuals to take advantage of the IRA Rollover incentive for the 2012 tax year:

  • IRA Rollover gifts made through January 31, 2013 may count as 2012 contributions.
  • Qualifying personal IRA distributions taken by individuals in the month of December 2012 can be counted as a "charitable rollover" if contributed to a charity as cash by January 31, 2013. Since many IRA owners take their mandatory distribution at the end of the year, this is an opportunity to transfer that distribution to a charity without treating it as taxable income.

2013:
The IRA Charitable Rollover Provision is reinstated for 2013. This means that donors aged 70 ½ and older can instruct their IRA administrators to make tax-free distributions of up to $100,000 directly from their IRAs to charitable organizations through December 31, 2013.

It is always wise to advise donors to contact their IRA administrator and/or tax advisors for more detail as you inform them that this important charitable giving incentive is once again available.

Next Steps: The League, in partnership with you, will continue to advocate to Congress for the IRA Rollover to be made permanent. In the meantime, please feel welcome to contact Heather Noonan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) or Najean Lee (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) with questions, or examples of how the IRA Rollover has benefitted the work of your orchestra.