Urge Congress to Support the Arts! - (February 1, 2011)

Urge Congress to Support the Arts

Washington, D.C.
- The President and Congressional leaders have announced their plans for making the U.S. more globally competitive and fiscally sound. Your orchestra can take action to influence whether and how the arts are supported in the new federal policy and funding debate.

Congress is beginning to make budget decisions that could dramatically impact funding for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and arts education . Late last month, the Republican Study Committee (RSC), a caucus comprising 176 conservative members of the House of Representatives, presented a proposal that calls for the elimination of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and arts education programs at the U.S. Department of Education. And, throughout this year, the new Congress and the Obama Administration will consider tax reform proposals that could considerably alter incentives for charitable giving to all nonprofit organizations.

In a year in which policymakers on both sides of the aisle are making tough decisions about their priorities, the very last thing we want to hear from any elected official this year is: "My constituents have not contacted me to say the arts are important to them."

Take Action Now

Help us make sure that every member of Congress is reached with a compelling message about the civic value of the arts:


1. Invite Them. Contact your federal elected officials and invite them to participate in an orchestra event. Congress is at home an unprecedented number of days this year. Take advantage of this opportunity to develop a relationship with your elected officials and show them - first hand - the impact of an orchestral experience. Take them backstage, let them see the workforce involved in presenting an orchestra event. View our Congressional Calendar to see when they will next be home.

2. Surprise Them. Ask an "unlikely suspect" to contact your elected officials in support of federal arts funding. This might be a business leader, mayor, local celebrity, or other individual with influence. The League's online resources will help you craft your messages on key policy issues such as the NEA, Arts Education funding, and Charitable Giving.

3. Tell Us. The League has two professional advocates in Washington, D.C., working every day in collaboration with the broader arts and nonprofit community to represent orchestras before Congress, the White House, and the federal agencies. Our success is completely dependent on hearing from you when you've contacted an elected official so that we can reinforce your message in D.C. Email Heather Noonan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) or Najean Lee (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) with your updates and stories.

Every Vote Counts, So Please Stay Tuned!

Federal support for the arts is a bipartisan policy matter, and every vote will count. Watch your inbox for League action alerts, calling on you to contact Congress when key votes arise.
No urgent letter or phone call can be as effective as establishing relationships with elected officials who directly experience your orchestra in action. Please begin that process now and keep us informed of the connections you've made to federal policy leaders.

Thank you for building relationships locally, and partnering with the League nationally to improve federal support for the arts.

 

 

Please direct any related questions to Heather Noonan, Vice President for Advocacy, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Najean Lee, Government Affairs & Education Advocacy Manager, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The League is a member of the Performing Arts Alliance, a coalition of national performing arts service organizations dedicated to advocating for national policies that recognize, enhance, and foster the contributions the performing arts make to America