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Jesse Rosen was a panelist at “What’s Next for Classical Music?,” a symposium hosted by Baltimore’s Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University.  Watch here.

Watch Jesse's address from the Closing Session at the League's 2014 National Conference!

Jesse spoke on NPR's Marketplace, public radio's program on business and the economy, about the challenges facing orchestras in today's economic climate. Hear the full interview!

In London at the recent Association of British Orchestras Convention, Jesse Rosen introduced a panel titled New Directions for Orchestras: The USA – What’s Going On? His speech gave a wide-ranging view of the state of the orchestra field. Read the speech here.

Read the latest from Jesse Rosen's blog on the Huffington Post! Make sure to become a fan or like this series on Facebook!

Jesse was named one of 2013's 50 Most Powerful and Influential People in the Nonprofit Arts! Read about Jesse and some of the other leaders who are making an impact in the arts.

Videos


What's Next for Classical Music?

 


It's About Time

(Transcript)


Imagining 2023

A feeling of possibility and promise is weaving its way into the fabric of the field. Innovation and experimentation have become the norm, not the exception, for orchestras. Imagining 2023 looks at the next ten years and what's possible—for you and your orchestra. Keynote address at the League's 2013 National Conference. Read the transcript of this speech.


Walk the Walk, Talk the Talk

League President and CEO Jesse Rosen shares some of the ways orchestras are realigning their strategy to meet community needs and reach out to a diverse and changing population. Presented at the League's 2012 National Conference. Read the transcript of this speech.


Red Alert!

The warning signals have been there for years: persistent deficits, less-than-packed houses, concerned patrons and funders questioning continued support, communities in transition asking more of us than we ably deliver, and too many concerts amidst changing and shrinking demand.

Despite great sacrifices from musicians and staffs and stepped up giving from boards and volunteers, too many orchestras --not all, for sure--but far too many, are in critical condition. We can and must act -- first, by speaking openly and frankly about our challenges, and next by looking deeply at how we operate. Presented at the League's 2011 National Conference. Read the transcript of this speech.